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Lemon Chiffon Gingersnap Pie

gingersnap

Lemon chiffon pie is a timeless dessert, filled with rich, tangy pudding lightened by whipped cream. Give this classic a wintry twist with a spicy gingersnap crust. A sealable plastic bag and a rolling pin make short work of crushing the cookies into crumbs.

Lemon Chiffon Gingersnap Pie

1 1/4 cups (4 oz./125 g.) gingersnap cookie crumbs

5 Tbs. (2 1/2 oz./75 g.) unsalted butter, melted

3/4 cup (6 oz./185 g.) plus 3 Tbs. granulated sugar

2 1/4 tsp. (1 package) unflavored powdered gelatin

1/8 tsp. kosher salt

3/4 cup (6 fl. oz./180 ml.) fresh lemon juice, strained

1 Tbs. finely grated orange zest

4 large egg yolks, lightly beaten

1 1/4 cups (10 fl. oz./310 ml.) heavy cream

1/4 cup (1 oz./30 g.) confectioners’ sugar

Preheat the oven to 350°F (180°C). In a bowl, stir together the crumbs, butter and 3 tablespoons granulated sugar until the crumbs are evenly moistened. Pat the crumb mixture firmly and evenly into the bottom and all the way up the sides of a 9-inch (23-cm.) pie pan or dish. Bake until the crust is firm, 5-7 minutes.

Pour 1/4 cup (2 fl. oz./60 ml.) cold water into a saucepan and sprinkle with the gelatin. Let stand until the gelatin softens and swells, 5-10 minutes. Stir in the 3/4 cup granulated sugar, salt, lemon juice, orange zest and egg yolks; the mixture will be lumpy. Cook over medium heat, stirring continuously, until the gelatin melts and the mixture thickens, 6-8 minutes. Do not allow the mixture to boil. Set the saucepan in an ice bath until the mixture is cool to the touch.

In a large bowl, using an electric mixer, whip the cream and confectioners’ sugar on medium-high speed until thick, soft peaks form. Spoon the whipped cream into the gelatin mixture and fold together with a rubber spatula until smooth. Pour into the prepared crust, smoothing the top.

Refrigerate the pie until chilled and firm, 3-4 hours. Let stand at room temperature for 20 minutes before serving. Serves 6-8.

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Lemon Chiffon Cake

chiffon

This moist, lemony chiffon cake is simple, delicate and delicious, with a texture that falls somewhere between a dense butter cake and a light, airy sponge cake. Take it to the next level with a topping of fresh blueberries and vanilla ice cream.

Lemon Chiffon Cake

3 or 4 lemons
2 1/4 cups (9 oz./280 g) cake flour
1 1/2 cups (12 oz./375 g) granulated sugar
1 Tbs. baking powder
1 tsp. kosher salt
1/2 cup (4 fl. oz./125 ml) canola oil
6 eggs, separated
1/4 cup (2 fl. oz./60 ml) water
1/2 tsp. cream of tartar

For the citrus glaze:
2 cups (8 oz./250 g) confectioners’ sugar, sifted, plus more if needed
2 Tbs. fresh lemon juice, strained, plus more if needed
1 Tbs. heavy cream

Preheat an oven to 325°F (165°C).

Grate the zest from the lemons and set aside. Juice the lemons and strain the juice into a liquid measuring pitcher. You should have 1/2 cup (4 fl. oz./125 ml). Have ready an ungreased 10-inch (25-cm) tube pan with a removable bottom.

Sift the flour, granulated sugar, baking powder and salt onto a sheet of parchment paper. In a bowl, combine the oil, egg yolks, lemon zest and lemon juice. Add the water and whisk until well mixed. Using a rubber spatula, gently fold in the flour mixture until the batter is smooth.

In a bowl, using an electric mixer, beat the egg whites and cream of tartar on medium-high speed until soft peaks form. Using the rubber spatula, gently fold half of the whites into the batter until almost fully incorporated. Add the remaining whites and gently fold in just until combined. The batter should be smooth but foamy. Pour the batter evenly into the tube pan.

Bake the cake until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean, 45 to 50 minutes. Remove from the oven and invert the pan onto a wire rack. Let the cake cool completely, upside down, about 45 minutes.

Rotate and tap the pan against the countertop until the cake disengages. Using the center tube, pull the cake out of the pan. Invert the cake onto the rack and disengage it gently from the pan bottom. Pull the pan bottom and tube from the cake.

To make the glaze, in a bowl, whisk together the 2 cups (8 oz./250 g) confectioners’ sugar, the 2 Tbs. lemon juice and the cream until the sugar dissolves and the glaze is smooth. Add a few more drops of lemon juice if the glaze is too thick, or a little more sugar if it is too thin. Pour the glaze over the top of the cake, letting it drizzle down the sides. When the glaze dries, transfer the cake to a platter. The cake is best served the day it is baked. Serves 10 to 12.

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Itsy-Bitsy Lemon Meringue Pies

lemon

Let’s face it: making a lemon meringue pie isn’t easy. But the rewards are great, especially if (like us!) you’re a major lemon fan. These little pies take some effort, but they are adorable, perfect for a party, and will impress your guests.

Itsy-Bitsy Lemon Meringue Pies

1 batch Flaky Pie Dough for single crust (recipe below)

For the filling:
3/4 cup (6 oz./185 g.) sugar
3 Tbs. cornstarch
Pinch of kosher salt
Finely grated zest of 2 lemons
4 large egg yolks, beaten
1/3 cup (3 fl. oz./80 ml.) fresh lemon juice, strained
2 Tbs. unsalted butter

For the meringue:
4 large egg whites
Pinch of cream of tartar
Pinch of kosher salt
1/2 cup (4 oz./125 g.) sugar

Prepare the flaky pie dough and chill as directed.

Lightly butter two 24-cup mini muffin pans. On a lightly floured work surface, roll out the dough quite thin, to 1/16-1/8 inch (2-3 mm.) thick. Using a 2 1/2-inch (6-mm.) round cutter, cut out as many disks as you can. Gather the scraps, press together, reroll, and cut more disks. You should have around 40 disks total. Gently press each disk into a muffin cup to line it evenly. Chill in the refrigerator for at least 20 minutes.

Position a rack in the middle of the oven and preheat to 375°F (190°C). Fill any empty muffin cups with a little water. Prick the bottoms of the shells with a fork. Bake the shells until golden brown, about 13 minutes. Let cool for about 5 minutes, then remove the shells from the pans and place on a rimmed baking sheet.

Have ready all the ingredients for the filling and meringue before you get started. In a saucepan, whisk together the sugar, cornstarch and salt. Whisk in 1 cup (8 fl. oz./250 ml.) water and the lemon zest and bring to a boil over medium-high heat, stirring constantly until the mixture starts to thicken. Place the yolks in a bowl, pour in a bit of the hot sugar mixture, and whisk together. Pour the yolks into the saucepan and whisk to combine. Bring to a simmer over medium-low heat, whisking constantly. Whisk in the lemon juice, then the butter. The mixture should be quite thick. Using a small spoon, fill the baked shells with the lemon filling. Place in the oven to stay warm while you make the meringue (you don’t want to leave the shells in the oven longer than 5 minutes, so you will need to work quickly!).

To make the meringue, in the bowl of a mixer fitted with the whip attachment, beat the egg whites, cream of tartar and salt on medium-high speed until frothy. Beating constantly, slowly sprinkle in the sugar. Beat until the meringue is thick and glossy (when you stop the beaters, the peaks should just barely curl at the ends).

Dollop the meringue on the pies, doing your best to spread it to the edges of the filling to seal the filling in the shells. You can also use a pastry bag and a medium tip to pipe the meringue onto the pies. Bake until the meringue is golden brown, 5-8 minutes. Let the pies cool completely before serving. Makes about 3 dozen mini pies.

Flaky Pie Dough

1 1/4 cups (6 1/2 oz./200 g.) all-purpose flour
1/4 tsp. kosher salt
1/2 tsp. sugar
7 Tbs. (3 1/2 oz./105 g.) very cold unsalted butter, cut into cubes
5 Tbs. (3 fl. oz./80 ml.) ice water, plus more if needed

In the bowl of a food processor, stir together the flour, salt, and sugar, if using. Sprinkle the butter over the top and pulse for a few seconds, or just until the butter is slightly broken into the flour but still in visible pieces. Evenly sprinkle the water over the flour mixture, then process just until the mixture starts to come together. Dump the dough into a large lock-top plastic bag, and press into a flat disk. Refrigerate the dough for 30 minutes or up to 1 day, or freeze for up to 1 month. Makes enough for one 9-inch (23-cm.) pie or tart.

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Glazed Cranberry-Lemon Cake

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Fresh cranberries and bright lemon zest and juice add refreshing qualities to this butter-rich cake. As the cake bakes, the cranberries are transformed into a sweet-tart compote-like topping. A simple lemon glaze makes a stunning finish.

 

Glazed Cranberry-Lemon Cake

1⁄3 cup (2 1⁄2 oz./75 g) firmly packed light brown sugar

3 cups (12 oz./375 g) cranberries

2 1⁄2 cups (12 1⁄2 oz./390 g) all-purpose flour

2 1⁄2 tsp. baking powder

1⁄2 tsp. baking soda

1 tsp. kosher salt

1 1⁄2 cups (12 oz./375 g) granulated sugar

2 lemons

3⁄4 cup (6 fl. oz./180 ml) buttermilk

1 1⁄2 tsp. pure vanilla extract

3⁄4 cup (6 oz./185 g) unsalted butter

3 large eggs

1 cup (4 oz./125 g) confectioners’ sugar, plus more as needed

Preheat the oven to 350°F (180°C). Generously butter a 3-qt (3-l) Bundt pan. Sprinkle the brown sugar in the bottom of the pan, then distribute the cranberries over the sugar.

Sift the flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt together into a bowl. Place the granulated sugar in the bowl of a stand mixer. Finely grate the zest from the lemons over the sugar and mix briefly. Juice the lemons and strain the juice into a small bowl. In a liquid measuring cup, combine 2 Tbs. of the lemon juice, the buttermilk and the vanilla; reserve the remaining lemon juice.

Add the butter to the bowl with the sugar and beat on medium-high speed until light and fluffy, 1 to 2 minutes. Beat in the eggs one at a time. Reduce the speed to low and add the dry ingredients in 3 batches, alternating with the lemon-buttermilk mixture in 2 batches. Increase the speed to medium-high and beat for 2 minutes.

Scrape the batter into the pan and spread it evenly over the cranberries. Bake until the cake is golden and a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean, 35 to 40 minutes. Let cool in the pan for 5 minutes, then invert the cake onto a plate and let cool completely.

In a bowl, whisk together the 1 cup confectioners’ sugar and 1 1⁄2 Tbs. of the reserved lemon juice until thick and smooth. Test the consistency by drizzling a bit of glaze over the cake. If it runs off the cake, whisk in a little more confectioners’ sugar; if it sits on the cake without moving, whisk in a little more lemon juice. Drizzle the glaze over the cake and let set for at least 15 minutes before serving.

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Tandoori Chicken Wings with Lemon-Yogurt Sauce

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These fun-sized chicken wings pack a serious punch of flavor. To round out a meal, serve the chicken with roasted potatoes (which can be dunked into the yogurt sauce, too) and a green salad. These wings are equally tasty at room temperature, making them a good choice for parties or picnics.

 

Tandoori Chicken Wings with Lemon-Yogurt Sauce

For the marinade:

3/4 cup (6 oz./180 g) plain whole-milk yogurt

1 Tbs. tomato paste

1 Tbs. fresh lemon juice

2 tsp. garam masala

1 tsp. ground turmeric

1 tsp. kosher salt

1/4 tsp. cayenne pepper

3 lb. (1.5 kg) whole chicken wings

For the yogurt sauce:

3/4 cup (6 oz./185 g) yogurt

Grated zest and juice of 1 lemon

1 Tbs. chopped fresh cilantro

Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper

To make the marinade, in a large bowl, stir together the yogurt, tomato paste, lemon juice, garam masala, turmeric, salt and cayenne. Set aside.

Using a sharp, heavy knife, separate the chicken wings into drumettes and wings, discarding the wing tip joint. Add the chicken pieces to the bowl with the marinade and toss to coat well. Cover and let marinate in the refrigerator for 30 minutes.

Preheat a broiler. Coat a baking sheet lightly with cooking spray, line with aluminum foil and coat again.

Remove the chicken wings from the marinade and arrange on the prepared pan. Slip under the broiler about 6 inches (15 cm) from the heat source and broil for 8 minutes. Remove the pan from the oven, flip the wings over, and broil until the chicken is opaque throughout, about 8 minutes longer. Don’t worry if the wings have blackened spots on them.

To make the yogurt sauce, in a bowl, combine the yogurt, lemon juice and zest, and cilantro and stir to mix well. Season with salt and pepper.

To serve, transfer the wings to a platter and spoon the yogurt sauce into a serving bowl alongside. Serve immediately. Serves 4.

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Try These 5 Lemon Preserving Projects at Home

DIY-Lemon-Preservation

With their bright, puckery flavor profile, lemons lend themselves easily to being the star of any kind of preserve, whether it’s a marmalade, curd, infusion, dried candy or even a savory condiment. This time of year, we especially love preserving the sweeter, more aromatic Meyer lemon, in season during late winter and early spring.

 

Lemon trees tend to bear fruit in sizable crops; if you have a plant nearby, don’t be surprised at the large size of your haul. Instead, next time life hands you lemons, add one—or all!—of these five fabulous lemon provisions to your larder.

1. Limoncello

How to Make Your Own Limoncello

Limoncello, the century-old digestivo that originated near Naples, Italy, gets its lemony hue and flavor from grain alcohol that’s been steeped in lemon zest with simple syrup. While limoncello is fantastic served chilled, it’s also wonderful in cocktails, like limoncello martinis.

 

2. Lemon Curd

Lemon curd

 

One can create a curd, or dessert spread, out of just about any fruit, but the most popular (and our most beloved) is lemon curd. Beat lemon juice and zest with egg yolks and sugar until creamy and thick, then serve it alongside scones or muffins. See our step-by-step how-to on making citrus curds.

 

3. Meyer Lemon Marmalade

Marmalade

Marmalade is most commonly made using oranges, but mild, thin-skinned, mandarin-esque Meyer lemons are also well-suited to the sweet, spreadable preserve. This Meyer lemon-ginger marmalade makes for a lovely weekend project.

4. Candied Lemon

Candied citrus

Crystallized fruit is one of the oldest forms of lemon preservation; glacés have been around since the 14th century. To make candied lemon, cut thin strips of lemon peel, candy them in a basic sugar syrup and roll them in superfine sugar after drying. The sweet, tangy treats make a perfect gift. (See our step-by-step onhow to candy citrus zest.)

 

5. Preserved Lemons

Preserved Lemons

Preserved lemon—a staple ingredient in North Africa—is becoming increasingly popular stateside, too. This condiment, which is simply lemons left to sit in salt, adds a wonderful acidity to salads, roasts and stews.